Does this sound like Dupuytrens contracture to you?

I was told i have Dupuytren’s contracture but i have my doubts. Symptoms of a very very painful middle finger in my non-dominant hand. If i touched or banged it, it could bring me to my knees. After the major acute pain stopped i had burning and tingling back of hand and palm side of finger. My finger curves and i can only straighten it manually. The finger triggers if i suddenly grab for something. It hurts like hell and i have to manually snap the finger up. It does not bend down at the proximal palm joint like most pictures show. the finger is swollen. made worse by weight gain. Now my right middle finger is starting to bother me although not as painful. My thumbs trigger though getting better, my right thumb has limited range of motion, and my left ring finger triggered in past. I cannot bend my middle fingers past 90 deg from proximal or middle knuckle making it difficult to grasp, open jars etc. I manually straighten my fingers daily. Diet does seem to make a difference, i have cut out sugar and wheat, salt, restaurant food aggravates.

I work full time at a job where i use computer. my other job is as a massage therapist, (no brainer, this is a lot of hand use). I am able to compensate to do massage and typing accentuates the curve as does driving (no power steering). I think i am going to start your dietary supplements but i still doubt the DC diagnosis… sorry this is so long trying to be clear and thorough. Does it sound like Dupuytrens contracture to you?

I have on one or two occasions i have  felt tightening in my foot and my wrists and forearm tendons seem to be involved. I can see the tendon in the hand is prominent, but no nodules. The finger bones close to the palm are sore. Upon manual manipulation i can feel popping in the middle phalanx joints of the affected fingers.I was diagnosed by a neurologist as having a slight nerve problem in the left forearm between the bones…interosseous nerve syndrome? I think, it is not very common. He is very good but didn’t see this as a nerve issue.

I am of Scandinavian descent, my father did have a contracture after breaking his hand in a jackhammer accident.

ANY ides, brief or otherwise would be helpful. I live in Hawaii and it is like a rural community. Very informed. Specialists are not the norm.

If needed i will call for a paid consult and can send pictures of my hand. I’m so happy to have found this site after a year of no meaningful information.

Thank you sincerely, Aloha, Dawn Matney

 

Aloha to you Dawn,

Thank you for the detailed description of your problem with finger and hand pain, and for the complement. My intention with the Dupuytren’s Contracture Institute is to offer meaningful information and suggestions while under the limited circumstance of not being able to see and examine the problems for which people need help. As  you can imagine I am only able to offer an educated guess as to what is going on with your hand problem.Ultimately you have to decide what is the truth of your situation and if you feel it is appropriate to seek out another opinion for a diagnosis and treatment.

Based solely on the description you offer, your problem does not sound as much like Dupuytren’s contracture.  My impression is that it is more likely an inflammation of the palmar tendon sheaths due to the trauma of extended overuse. 

Using your hands rather continuously as you do now between full time work with a computer plus massage therapy is more than your hands can tolerate.   In that last sentence I would like for you to consider the operative phrase, “as you do now.”   What I am suggesting to you is that you evaluate exactly how you are typing on the keyboard and the way you use your arms and hands for body work. I suspect that you are using bad habits that are stressing your shoulders, arms forearms and hands, and this is the cause of most – if not all of your current hand pain.  I tend to be far too aggressive when I type; by the end of the day, if I have not controlled my hand action, I can make the tips of my fingers sore to the touch.  You too are probably not working to your best mechanical advantage.  Observe yourself while at work and see what you can do differently, or not at all, that might help your situation.              

While trigger finger and pain are sometimes a component of Dupuytren’s contracture, no the primary problem as you have presented your current situation.  Also, while you are of Scandinavian descent (and hereditary factors favor those of Scandinavian descent for Dupuytren’s contracture) you made your father’s hand problem sound more like a hand problem that arose from one particular work accident, so my impression is that you probably do not have DC in your immediate family history.  You do not report a palm nodule nor cords and these are almost mandatory to establish a diagnosis of Dupuytrens.   Lastly, you report that your diet seems to make an impact on your hand symptoms; this would not likely be true for a pure Dupuytren problem.  Put all these things together  and to me it does add up as a case of Dupuytren’s contracture.

I suggest that you look around your island to see if there is a good chiropractor or naturopath who can work with you from a dietary, structural and soft tissue basis to control and eliminate your upper extremity problem. 

Is there a substitute for DMSO I can use to treat my hand?

Hello Dr. Herazy,

I am researching the therapies you are recommending. Since I am allergic to Sulfa drugs I probably do not want to use DMSO. Assuming I can tolerate the topical E and the CP Serum is there another carrier oil or gel that I could use instead of the DMSO? Maybe Jojoba oil or olive oil?

Thank you

Diane B

 

Greetings Diane,

Although it is not as good as DMSO for the purpose of driving the topical E and Super CP Serum copper peptides into the Dupuytren palm nodule and cord tissue, you can use Emu oil for this purpose.    The emu is a bird from New Zealand and Australia.  Oil from this bird has some tissue penetrating properties and can be used also.   TRH

Why is Xiaflex not indicated for palmar nodules?

Hello,

Why is Xiaflex not indicated for palmar nodules? If it weakens and dissolves the cord, why would it not dissolve a nodule?

Thank you,

RSW

 

Greetings RSW,

The fact is a Xiaflex injection would weaken and dissolve a palm nodule, but then you would have a hole in the palm of your hand.   For this reason Xiaflex is only used to treat Dupuytren cords which are below the surface of the skin.

Of course, with Xiaflex injections the medical profession knows that the Dupuytren cords will return rather quickly, usually just a few years, and more injections would then be used.  There are two problems in doing this:  1. No one knows what happens to the body with repeated Xiaflex injections.  2. Each time a person has a Xiaflex injection as a Dupuytrens treatment he or she runs the risk of having the Xiaflex dissolve normal tissue and cause problems greater than having Dupuytren’s contracture.  For this reason we strongly suggest that anyone with Dupuytrens contracture first attempts to correct their problem using Alternative Medicine.  TRH     

DMSO Questions

I the dmso you sell a “pharmaceutical” grade or “industrial” grade?

How is the dmso applied and in what amount?

Greetings,

The DMSO is  of a pharmaceutical grade from the oldest medical DMSO source in the U.S., still operated by Stanley Jacobs, MD, who did the original research at the Washington State School of Medicine on the medical use of DMSO in the late 1950s.   Dr. Jacobs is in his 90s and still teaches and works in the laboratory at the medical school.  We use his Dusa Sal formula that he recommends for Dupuytren contracture.

The Dusa Sal DMSO is applied to the hand directly over the palm nodule and cord formations, usually just a few drops per application.   In additional to the Dusa Sal we recommend that you also use vitamin E oil and a copper peptide at the same time.    When you get Dusa Sal from DCI you will receive a detailed instructional sheet of information in your order so that you know exactly how to apply the DMSO and related therapies.    TRH

Dupuytren Cords

Dupuytren cord causes finger contractures

Dupuytren contracture is thought to be primarily a genetic condition that mainly affects men over 50 years of age, with more aggressive forms starting at an earlier age.  Women also develop Dupuytren cords, but at a lesser rate until age 80 when the occurrence is about equal to men. The process involves excess collagen material that creates Dupuytren cords in the palm of the hand, most often affecting the 4th and 5th fingers.   These cords are nodular in two out of three cases, displaying from one to three nodules when present.

Onset occurs as a palm nodule or bump that many assume is only a callus.  Gradually, over a few or many months, the Dupuytren cord becomes more prominent and the palmar fascia thickens. As the process continues the overlying skin puckers, dimples, and roughens. The thick cords contract slowly over time, drawing the fingers into the palm and may bring adjacent fingers together. The ring and little finger are most commonly affected and usually are affected first when other fingers are also involved.  As is typical of similar conditions in which excess collagen is deposited (Ledderhose disease, Peyronie’s disease, Garrod’s pads) the progression is often erratic, arbitrary, continues in spite of medical treatment, and has no obvious cause.

Dupuytren cords treated with Alternative Medicine

Dupuytren cords are composed of collagen connective tissue right under the skin, in a layer called the palmar fascia.  As the Dupuytren contracture progresses the cords begin to thicken and shorten, causing them to develop a wider display of nodules and folds of thick tissue on the surface of the palm.  Tightening and shortening of the Dupuytren cords pulls the involved fingers down toward the palm in the characteristic hand posture of Dupuytren contracture.

Dupuytren’s contracture is more likely to be found in those who also have epilepsy (anticonvulsant medications are suspected to be the stimulus), diabetes, alcoholism, HIV, liver cirrhosis, and smoking. Trauma and exposure to chronic hand vibration may also exacerbate this condition.

Needle aponeurotomy or more aggressive surgical intervention are the only current medical methods offered to temporarily alleviate some of the outward appearance of Dupuytren contracture.  In spite of having both needle aponeurotomy and surgery, 50% of patients who have either procedure will still experience a recurrence of the palm nodules and Dupuytren cords within two to three years.

There is another option to consider using to slow down or even reduce the size, shape and  density of Dupuytren cords.   The Dupuytren Contracture Institute has specialized since 2002 in the use of Alternative Medicine therapies and techniques that are found to be successful in perhaps 60-80% of cases of Dupuytrens without risk of worsening or side-effects.  Click here for helpful ideas to start a Dupuytren treatment plan with Alternative Medicine.