Is this lump in my palm anything to worry about?

Lump on palm of hand should be investigated

As a general rule, anytime you discover something new happening to your body you should be concerned enough to quickly determine if the new situation has important short- and long-term consequences.   In the case of a bump, nodule or lump on the palm of the hand that appears without reason, it could be important and should not be dismissed.

Of course, the first explanation for a palm lump or nodule is that it could be a simple callus.  If a callus makes sense based on new or greater manual work you have been doing recently, especially without the protection of gloves, then that is probably all the concern that is necessary.

However, if you have not been using your hands more than usual lately, then you should do a quick mental inventory of any other recent symptoms you have noted about your hand:

  • Can’t extend or straighten one or more fingers
  • Can’t open hand completely
  • Can’t lay palm flat down on a table top
  • Fingers won’t open up after being used
  • Fingers won’t straighten
  • Fingers are restricted in full movement
  • Fingers curling in toward palm
  • Pinky finger or ring finger won’t extend fully
  • Lump, bump or nodule on the palm of the hand
  • Can’t open hands without pain
  • Stinging or burning pain in hand
  • Feels like a swollen tendon in the palm of hand
  • Feels like hand constricting and won’t open easily

If you note one or more symptoms that reduce your ability to use your hand and fingers, then you could have a fairly common condition known as Dupuytren contracture.

Lump in palm of hand common Dupuytren contracture finding

Dupuytren contracture is a problem of the soft tissue characterized by thickening and shortening of fibrous bands located in the deep tissue of the palm of the hand (palmar fascia), caused by an excess amount of a tissue protein called collagen.  As this progresses a cord of tissue will develop below the surface or a lump in the palm on the surface, resulting in reduced mobility and contracture of the hand and finger.  This involvement can affect one or both hands, and a variable number of fingers.  Dupuytren contracture presents in a wide variation, from a mild and slowly progressing contracture of a single finger, to severe and rapidly progressive involvement of several fingers of both hands, or many variations in between.

Alternative medicine treatment when combined into an aggressive assembly of natural therapies (vitamin E, PABA, acetyl-L-carnitine, massage, stretching, copper peptides, systemic enzymes, etc.) are often effective in reducing or eliminating the excess collagen cord or nodule formation and the subsequent finger contracture that so often prevents the 4th and 5th finger from being able to extend or open fully and keeps the involved fingers curled in toward the palm.   For information about using natural treatment methods to treat Dupuytren’s contracture, and to possibly avoid the need for Dupuytren release surgery, click natural Dupuytren Treatment Plan.

One or more dimpled and thickened bumps on the palm are most often caused by Dupuytren’s contracture.  This is especially true for any unusual small nodule or lump on the hand that appears on the palm at the base of the 4th (ring) or 5th (pinky) fingers, especially if the involved finger or fingers won’t completely straighten out.  Although it is always advisable to get a medical diagnosis of this kind of health problem, it is possible to develop a strong suspicion the problem is Dupuytren disease if several indicators and factors are present in your history:

  • Ancestors who came from England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales, or a Scandinavian country
  • One or more family members also have Dupuytren contracture
  • Palm lump located immediately at the base of the ring and/or pinky finger
  • Age 45 plus
  • Male
  • History of manual labor doing heavy or repetitive work, often with hands unprotected
  • History of tobacco smoking
  • Diabetes
  • Alcohol abuse or liver disease
  • Epilepsy

Dupuytren contracture will often return or recur within a few years after surgery that releases the finger contracture by removing the cords or lumps on the palm.  In fact, some forms of Dupuytren surgery have am 80% recurrence rate 3-5 years after the first operation, and even faster recurrence for a 2nd or 3rd surgery.  Hand surgery should not be seen as a solution or cure for Dupuytren’s contracture since recurrence is such a common problem not only for hand surgeons, but also the patients they serve.

Many surgeons voice the opinion that in many cases Dupuytren hand surgery seems to accelerate and worsen the development of cords and lumps on the palm.  For this reason it is suggested that a person who has Dupuytren cords and lumps should first attempt a therapeutic trial of aggressive Alternative Medicine to determine if the body is capable of reversing or even eliminating the tissue changes that makes the fingers curl in toward the palm and prevents the hand from opening completely. If after two or three months of natural treatment no change is seen, Dupuytren surgery can always be done at a later time.

Natural alternative therapies such as suggested by the Dupuytren Contracture Institute do not receive evidence-based research because of their limited profit potential and easy access by laypeople, and so have little support from the medical profession.  Even so, with a little independent research on this website it should be obvious that these natural healing ideas make sense and do not interfere with subsequent medical treatment.

 

Outline of an early case of Dupuytren’s contracture

Hello Dr. Herazy,

I’m looking for some help in determining if I am in the early stages of Dupuytren’s contracture.

I have a small palm lump under the skin on my left hand that is noticeable. I have another flatter callous feeling item on my right hand, not noticeable unless you push on it. Neither are painful.I have not contraction of any fingers, these look like they are in line with my middle finger. I can easily lay my hand flat. I am 54, male, and not of any particular ethnic decent. I have Italian, Spanish, American Indian and English/Scottish in my ancestry.

 

Greetings,

Based on your description, there is a very high likelihood you are outlining the occurrence of an early stage Dupuytren contracture of both hands.  I suggest you get a firm medical diagnosis of your hand condition to be sure.

Now would be an excellent time to begin Alternative Medicine treatment of your Dupuytrens problem.   TRH 

If it is not Dupuytren contracture what else could keep my finger bent down?

Dupuytren Contracture and Similar Conditions

There are actually only a few different conditions that might be confused with Dupuytren contracture.

These are the primary hand conditions, other than Dupuytren contracture, that can prevent the finger from straightening out from a flexed position:

  1. Trigger finger – this is the sticking and sudden release of restricted flexor tendon in the sheath that also commonly as an associated aspect of  Dupuytren’s contracture
  2. Ulnar nerve injury – results in a “claw hand deformity” of the entire, due to lack of extensor muscle function
  3. Extensor tendon rupture – often associated with direct trauma or arthritis
  4. Subluxation or slipping of  extensor tendons between the knuckles associated with arthritis
  5. Ganglion cyst, or a soft-tissue mass – often presents as a small and movable nodule that is tender to palpation at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint, and not as far back into the palm as Dupuytren usually is located; often seen in people younger than 50 years of age and without common risk factors for Dupuytren disease
  6. Post-traumatic or arthritic joint stiffness
  7. Sarcoma – biopsy will most likely reveal a benign etiology (e.g., lipoma, inclusion cyst).

>> Testimonials from Dupuytren Contracture Institute

>> Dupuytren surgery

The major differentiation sign between these listed conditions and Dupuytren contracture is that none of them is associated with the appearance of nodule or cord development on the palmar surface of the hand.  Based on this single point of differentiation the diagnosis of Dupuytren contracture is a fairly simple and straight forward matter.  However the diagnosis can be made more complex when the person with Dupuytren contracture also has present at the same time one or more of these other conditions.

Making the differentiation between Dupuytren contracture and other hand problems easier, the following points should be kept in mind:

  1. Typically the person with Dupuytren  disease is 50 years or older
  2. The likelihood of Dupuytren disease increases when a pitting or indentation is observed over the nodule(s) or alongside the cord(s)
  3. The likelihood of Dupuytren disease increases further when the nodule or cord formation is present bilaterally.

Early treatment of a Dupuytren contracture makes for a better outcome.  Learn more about using Alternative Medicine for Dupuytren treatment on the DCI website.

>> How to start Dupuytren treatment with Alternative Medicine

>> Dupuytren Contracture Treatment – FAQs

What does Dupuytren’s contracture look like?

Pictures of Dupuytren’s contracture show lumps in the palm, cords and fingers deformity   

Before displaying several Dupuytren contracture pictures it might be helpful to explain that there are two primary lesions associated with this problem.

  1. Dupuytren nodule or lump on the palm surface – This often looks like a callus on the palm or melted wax on the palm surface, usually located at the base of the 4th (ring) or 5th (pinky) fingers.  The skin is often dimpled or depressed along with a slightly raised surface, and will often appear to be a slightly darker color due to the thickening of the tissue that is taking place, similar to a callus.  As the condition progresses you will probably notice the palm lump having more clearly defined edges, deeper depressions or dimples, and thicker over time.
  2. Dupuytren cord below the palm surface – You will not directly see the cord since it is below the surface of the skin.  A cord raises the skin surface like one of the larger ligaments that you notice standing out and pushing the skin up, on the inside surface of your wrist or the bend of your elbow, when you make a fist or lift something heavy.  A cord will be found extending from the upper palm at one end to the base of the finger at the other end.  As the condition progresses you will probably notice the cord getting thicker and more pronounced over time.

In addition to the appearance of the skin related to Dupuytren’s contracture, there is also the condition of the finger flexion that is part of the visual image that is important.  As the contractures continue to thicken and shorten the involved fingers begin to flex down toward the palm.  Over time those fingers will slowly and progressively become bent, unable to straighten completely, and will be somewhat claw-like in appearance.

These Dupuytren’s disease pictures that follow should be used only for general knowledge, to compare or confirm what the reader might be experiencing, or just to see how severe the finger contracture and hand deformity can develop. In the early stages of Dupuytrens contracture everyone feels worried about the small – and sometimes large – changes in the appearance of the hand.  Not knowing about a problem and how bad it can become can be the worse part of a condition like this.

No picture of Dupuytren contracture will look exactly like what you might be experiencing.  Therefore, they are not intended to assist in making a diagnosis of Dupuytren’s contracture.  If you have not yet visited your doctor to have your hand lumps examined, allow these Dupuytren pictures to motivate you to seek prompt medical attention and a doctor’s opinion about your problem. Perhaps after studying these Dupuytren images you will feel relieved you are not so bad off in comparison to other people’s situation.

Hopefully, these Dupuytren’s pictures will be helpful to understand what this problem can look like, motivate you to get a thorough medical evaluation, and then get busy following an aggressive Alternative Medicine therapy plan to improve your changes for self-recovery to overcome your problem.  Click on Dupuytrens Treatment, to determine how to incorporate the aggressive use of multiple conservative measures to treat the fibrous thickening you might be experiencing.

Please feel free to contribute your own Dupuytren contracture pictures to DCI for inclusion on this page.

picture of Picture of Dupuytren contracture of left hand, showing well developed palm lump and pit formation with moderate ring finger flexion

 

picture of Picture of Dupuytren contracture of left hand, showing cord and advanced flexion of ring finger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Picture of Dupuytren lumps or nodules at base of 2nd and 3rd fingers of left hand

 

 

 

 

 

Dupuytren cord and little finger contracture of left hand, clearly defined on palmPicture of Dupuytrens, right hand with palm lump at base of pinky fingerPicture of Dupuytren lump on palm of right hand with slight flexion of middle finger

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dupuytren contracture picture, lump on palm of right hand, deep dimples and thickeningPicture of bilateral Dupuytren's contracture, clearly showing cords and riing finger contracture worse on the left hand

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dupuytren's contracture photo, left hand, well developed nodule or lump on palm and moderate finger flexionPicture of Dupuytren disease, multiple lumps on palms of both hand

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is the Best Dupuytren’s Treatment?

No single therapy works best to reduce Dupuytren contracture

Every week, without fail, some poor soul who has received a diagnosis about his palm lump finally comes to the internet and eventually writes me asking, “What is the best way to treat Dupuytren contracture?”

A common question, and a good one, designed to get to the core of the matter.

Although I would be delighted to reply with the name of one particular therapy or one special way to treat Dupuytrens, I cannot do that.

After working on the Alternative Medicine solution to this problem since 2002, I have found the best way to treat Dupuytren contracture is to use everything you can throw against it.  You must deliver a wide assortment of concentrated nutritional therapies to support your immune response from a variety of directions so that your body can repair and eliminate the finger contractures and bump on the palm of the hand that reduce your hand dexterity.  It is that kind of problem.

Many have tried to find it, but eventually come to realize there is no one therapy that is a magic bullet against Dupuytren contracture.  There are no wonder cures, no nifty little tricks that will allow your finger to move freely and easily again. Dupuytren Contracture Institute has found the best treatment is the one that stimulates the tissue to heal and repair the area on the palm of the hand.  For each person this seems to be an individual assortment of different therapies.

Dupuytren treatment using Alternative Medicine is best to start

Each person must educate himself about the hand contracture problem, read about the different Alternative Medicine therapies and what they might do to assist that healing process, determine if there are any indictors that one or more might be indicated, and then consider the time, effort and cost involved.  Lastly, it is necessary to determine how important it is to you to regain the full use of your hand.   Based on all this, you should feel comfortable with a plan of action that might have to be followed for several months as you go about doing all you can to improve your body’s ability to heal and repair the hand contracture of Dupuytren.

Those who eventually get good results with their Dupuytren problem are the tough and determined people who just keep going after it day after day with as much therapy as they can manage to use, until they seem to overwhelm the dense fibrous tissue into submission and eventual elimination.  Slowly they gain on it, with the hand nodules becoming softer and smaller; slowly these areas of finger and hand contracture come around.  Some people get fantastic results and some get only moderate results – very few who work hard at it do poorly.  There usually is progress to be made if you work at it.

So, the question again is, “What is the best way to treat Dupuytren contracture?”      the answer appears to be for each person to do all that you can for as long as you can until your body overwhelms the Dupuytren nodules and lumps that cause the fingers to draw up to the palm.  To do less is to allow Dupuytren contracture to ruin your life.