Lumps on Palms

Lumps on palm of hands:  Dupuytren Contracture

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Dupuytren contracture causes lumps on palms and contracture of hand tissueLumps on palms of either hand can develop when a thin layer of tissue (fascia) just under the skin of the palm becomes thicker than normal in the early stages of Dupuytren contracture.  Often a small lump or series of distorted pits or lumps on the palms are first noticed.  The area of the palm is usually in line with the ring and middle finger, and less often the little finger.  Most commonly one finger is involved, two finger involvement is seen occasionally and three finger involvement is rare.

Many times involvement can be with lumps on palms of both hands, but not the same pattern:  one hand can have one lump, while the other hand has several lumps in the palm.  Or, one hand can have a lump in the palm at the middle finger while the other hand has a lump in the palm of the ring finger.

Later, tough firm cords develop beneath the skin, going from the palm into the fingers.  These cords look like tendons, but are actually located between the skin and the tendons that move the fingers.  Over time, these cords may cause the one or more fingers to bend or curl into the palm.  Even though the surface skin and fascia are involved in this process, the deeper tissues like the tendons are not affected or part of the process.  On occasion, when lumps on the palm of the hands appear, it will also cause thickening on top of the knuckles (finger knuckle pads).

Cause of lumps on palms of the hands

The cause of Dupuytren contracture has not been determined, although a biochemical problem within the fascia is possible.   People over 40 years of age, especially men, and those who trace their ancestry to Scandinavian and northern UK countries, are more likely to develop the lumps on the palms of the hands of Dupuytren contracture.   There is no statistical evidence that these lumps on the palm of the hand start after hand injuries or chemical exposure.

Symptoms of lumps on palm of hand

Lumps on palms of the hands may cause a little discomfort when they first form, but Dupuytren’s disease is not typically a painful condition. The first symptom of the palm lump of Dupuytren contracture is difficulty laying the hand down flat on a firm surface.  Once the irregular lumps on the palms cause the fingers to curl toward the palm, depending on the number of fingers and degree of involvement, many activities of daily living can become increasingly difficult until they are impossible to do with the involved hand:

●  Wear gloves    Dupuytren contracture inerfers with full use of hand
●  Wash hands
●  Shake hands with someone
●  Type a message
●  Applaud
●  Put hand in a pocket
●  Use a knife and fork
●  Hold a car steering wheel

The earlier in life the lumps on palms appear, the more severe the condition tends to be and symptoms are proportionately drastic.

Surgical treatment of lumps on palms

Most medical website devoted to Dupuytren contracture casually assume that the only way to deal with any lump on the palm of the hand is to surgically remove it.  While this might be necessary in some cases, it is important to keep in mind:

●  Every surgery has risks, and it is best to first attempt conservative measures t
●  Alternative medicine can be successful in aiding the body reduce and even remove lumps on the palms of the hands

Natural and conservative treatment of lumps on the palms of the hands can be tired for a few months to determine how successful this form of treatment will be for you.   Since 2002 the Dupuytren Contracture Institute has helped people around the world avoid surgery by using Alternative Medicine methods to reduce and eliminate the lumps on the palms of their hands.

6 thoughts on “Lumps on Palms

  1. Thomas Bannon says:

    Both of my brothers (half brothers from same mother) have or had Dupuytren’s contracture. My brother Elliott now deceased had them removed twice I believe. My other brother Greg has them now. I am now 62 and they have been slowly forming on both palms but mostly on the left hand. I have no restrictions of any fingers as of yet. Not sure if the Dupuytren’s contracture is at a point to start to worry about treatment.

  2. Dr.Herazy says:

    Greetings Thomas,

    Since your Dupuytren’s contracture has a strong familial tendency, it is reasonable to assume your hand lumps would also be as active as your brothers.

    I believe it is also reasonable to treat your Dupuytren’s contracture while they are as immature as possible. When using Alt Med to treat Dupuytren’s contracture it is not necessary to use the surgeon’s reference for timing surgery; the sooner the better as far as your body and healing is concerned.

    People would like to believe that their hand surgery will be wonderfully successful, but it turns out that a comparatively few are and all eventually require another surgery since recurrence of the problem eventually occurs. I believe the best approach is to first try to avoid any type of direct physical intervention with Dupuytren’s contracture by doing all that you can to increase your natural ability to heal DC. We find that we get 8-10 reports of moderate to marked success of natural treatment, for every one report of failure. In addition, since doing this Alt Med work there has never been a report of recurrence after using the DCI methods and no report of side effects.

    If I can answer any questions about natural Dupuytren’s contracture treatment please let me know. TRH

  3. Cheryl says:

    I was just diagnosed yesterday with Dupuytren’s contracture. But, I am thinking of getting another orthopedic surgeons opinion. Reason being …. I don’t fit any of the categories of people whom develop this disease other than maybe down the line some Scandinavian ancestry. I’m a 50 yr old female, don’t drink, smoke, have diabetes and no one as far back as my mom can remember ever had deformed hands. Do the lumps/nodules appear on the surface of the palm or inside. My small lump is inside my palm no cords, pitting, and it’s not directly underneath any finger: I also can place my hand flat on a table surface.. Maybe I’m just in denial of this horrible disease, any thoughts would help as this is very distressing. I’ve only had this lump since 1/18/19. Thank you

  4. Dr.Herazy says:

    Greetings Cheryl,

    I understand. Based on what you have said about yourself, you are in the majority of people who try to make sense why they developed Dupuytren’s contracture. From what I learn from people from around the world, most don’t fit into common diabetes, liver disease, smoking categories. The most common category represented concerns Scandinavian genetics (often without known family history of Dupuytren’s contracture). However there is a much stronger and active predisposition factor that is less often discussed or investigated. Dupuytren’s Contracture Institute is currently preparing to conduct an upcoming research project concerning the predisposition for Dupuytren’s contracture not only by various occupations and avocations, but how a person might use their hands and upper extremities in any occupation or avocation that would predispose for Dupuytren’s contracture. This factor is strong and rather commonly active in many people with Dupuytren’s contracture, as suggested by the rather common occurrence of DC among musicians.

    My current thinking is that there is nothing inherently wrong or detrimental in any particular musical instrument, but more so how a person uses or abuses the hands and upper extremities while playing. Time will tell.

    You might want to think how this might apply to you as you consider the possibilities of how and why you might have developed Dupuytren’s contracture.

    Typically, the common lesions of Dupuytren’s contracture will appear on the surface of the palm, not below the surface. Typically, the palm lump or nodule can be directly below or not directly below or in alignment with the involved finger. Typically, in the early phases of Dupuytren’s contracture there will be no difficulty in placing the palm completely and fully down on a flat surface; some people retain their finger range of motion for a comparatively long time or at least as long as the condition does not advance. There are many variables about Dupuytren’s contracture, and so it is not always valid to isolate on one missing factor while ignoring others.

    I agree that you should seek out a second opinion. There is certainly the possibility that you might have a cyst or other benign growth in the palm. You need to be confident and convinced about what is happening in your hand. Please come back to this website to inform our readers what you have learned. Good luck. TRH

  5. Janice M Smith says:

    Help! I have funny bumps in both palms near the beginning of my fingers. Maybe it is Dupuytren’s contracture. I am 67 years old and 1/2 Norwegian and then Northwest Indian. This thing is rather painful and affecting my sewing, beadwork, and gardening. I do have Diabetes and use Insulin injections. I also have had two knees and one hip replaced, and need the other done ASAP. I hope it is not where I need more surgery. Please help.

  6. Dr. Herazy says:

    Greetings Janice,

    First things first. Find out if you have Dupuytren’s contracture. You have to know what you are dealing with.

    If it is DC, your Scandinavian heritage would make hand surgery likely to result only in a fast recurrence of more Dupuytren’s contracture. No one can predict the speed of DC recurrence, so a person is better off not getting into that position in the first place. I am not advising to not have hand surgery. Only that you should do all that you can to avoid it, if at all possible. My advice is to be very conservative.

    First, if it is Dupuytren’s contracture, try to help your self heal your hand with a broad base of natural therapies like you will find on the DCI website. DCI gets reports of moderate to marked reduction of the Dupuytren’s contracture nodules and cords, for every one report of failure. Those are decent odds that are worth using if you it helps you avoid hand surgery. For more information, this is a good place to start Select Dupuytren’s contracture treatment.

    Lastly, I suggest finding the very best hand surgeon you can locate and hearing him/her out. Listen carefully to what you hear, and carefully evaluate what you learn.

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