Since I am allergic to sulfur can I treat my Dupuytrens contracture with sulfur containing supplements?

Hello Dr. Herazy,

I have been looking at your various treatment plans for Dupuytren contracture.  Each plan contains Fundamental Sulfur, or more technically methyl sulfonyl methane.  I am allergic to sulfur drugs.  Since I cannot take sulfur, will the treatment plans still be effective in treating the lump on the palm from my Dupuytrens?

 

Greetings,

As you know, sulfur sensitivity and allergies are not uncommon.  Over the years I have worked with many people who have allergy to sulfur drugs, a few very severe, and they have used all the DCI sulfur mineral supplement (Fundamental Sulfur) without any reported problem.  While I cannot predict how you might respond I can only tell you that others have no problem while using it like anyone else .   

I assume the difference that a person with a sulfur allergy can use this particular sulfur product comes down to fundamental chemistry.  The sulfur in these supplements is recognized by the body as a nutritional substance or food, and not as a foreign sulfur configuration of a drug that the body has never seen or metabolized previously; since this kind of sulfur is natural and organic, with the micronutrients and enzymes that are present with foods that contain sulfur, the supplement is more likely to be handled differently and appropriately by the body.  It is different with a sulfur containing drug, whether oral or topical.  In these situations the sulfur is not combined with chemicals in a way that is typical in nature. 

If I can help you in any way with your Dupuytren’s treatment, please let me know.   TRH

 

Could statin drugs to control my cholesterol have caused my Dupuytren’s contracture?

I have Dupuytren contracture; 59 years old white female. I have been on 80 mg of a statin for several years. I understand statin drugs can be very harmful to the liver, especially at this dose?  Since, I have decided to stop taking it for that reason. Do you think this could have caused the Dupuytren contracture, since your above reply implies liver disease? I do not drink alcohol but could this high dose of the statin have caused liver damage leading to the Dupuytrens?

Thank you,

Jennifer

 

Greetings Jennifer,

You are correct that high dosage statin intake has been implicated in Dupuytren’s contracture.  The exact mechanism that statin drugs might cause Dupuytrens as a side effect are not completely understood at this time, although liver damage is often mentioned as a possibility. Please see Dupuytren Cause Could Be Related to Drugs

You should speak to the doctor who prescribed your statin drug for you, who did not explain the possibility that Dupuytren’s contracture might occur as a result, and ask these same questions and listen closely to the answer.   TRH

My 25 year-old son has Dupuytren’s contracture. What treatment would you recommend?

Hi Dr. Herazy,
I came across your website while searching for more information on Dupuytren Contracture. My son had intricate surgery on his finger in June and recently noticed a small lump on the palm of his hand. It’s not painful, but the doctor said it looked like Dupuytren Disease. He is only 25 years old and I am very concerned about the future. Have you seen this before in someone his age and can he stop the progression of this disease with your products? What treatment would you recommend for someone his age? There also may be a predisposition to this as I have a painful lump on the bottom of my foot that I will be checking out with a doctor. Thank you very much.
PG

 

Greetings PG,

You are a good parent.  Once a parent, always a parent.  My youngest one of three is soon to be 38, so I know how this goes.

My guess is that you have a genetic predisposition to this excessive fibrous tissue response that your son has inherited from you.  This is made even more so if both you and your husband/wife are also genetically predisposed with families coming from Northern Europe or Scandinavia.  If this is true it would explain why some one who is so young has developed this problem.  Perhaps your son has unknowingly made himself susceptible with other factors that increase the odds for Dupuytrens:  diabetes, cigarette smoking, alcoholism, and prolonged hand stress  like with manual labor.  I also notice that many serious musicians who play piano or guitar seem to develop DC more than the average population.  Any of these might explain this problem developing so early in his life. 

I have seen this before in people in their mid-20s and it is usually accompanied by factors as I have explored above.

I would recommend the largest and most aggressive treatment he can sustain for at least 3-4 months of faithful and diligent work.   If this problem is to respond at all to Alternative Medicine methods the treatment approach must be significant to make an impact on his condition.  Please read Can I treat Dupuytren’s contracture naturally without surgery or drugs?       Dupuytrens is a tough problem.  Half efforts are usually a waste of time.  Allow me to explain why I think someone such as your son should be extremely interested – far more than most all other people – in avoiding surgery and getting natural conservative treatment to increase his ability to eliminate his hand nodule.  

Hand surgery for Dupuytren’s contracture is not a cure; any good surgeon will tell you that needle aponeurotomy, palmar fasciectomy or Xiaflex injection are just a temporary measure; the Dupuytren’s contracture problem will always recur – it is a matter of when the recurrence will develop, not if.  When someone in his 60s or 70s develops DC and has surgery, the Dupuytren recurrence factor is not as important because frankly at that age this person might not live long enough to develop the recurrence and have it evolve over a few years to the point that a second surgery is important to them.  Many elderly people get their first DC surgery and just ride out the effects of the recurrence as they try to ignore a growing hand problem.  But with a 25 year old person all of this strategy is changed.

A young person has a lifetime to not only develop one recurrence of Dupuytren contracture, but several or many.   Some people can have a recurrence in just just 2-3-4 years and a few have recurrence in a year or less.  With each surgery recurrence usually is made to come more quickly; with each hand surgery the rate of recurrence increases.  It is as though the irritation and instability created by the surgery speeds up the recurrence phenomenon.    Many times after a few surgeries are done it does happen that eventually amputation is the only viable option that remains. 

With someone in his mid-20s this can be a great problem, since there are so many wonderful years that lay ahead.   For this reason it is my opinion your son should do absolutely everything possible to avoid entering upon this slippery slope.  I suggest that your son start as soon as possible to see if he can increase his natural ability to remove this foreign fibrous palm lump.  As with anything in healthcare (like Dupuytren’s hand surgery) there are no guarantees this will work, but when you consider the fact that his approach is without side effects, that in almost 11 years we have not had one report of recurrence after successful treatment, and that surgery can also be used at a later time if  necessary.

I suggest he does some reading on the DCI site to learn how this approach is done.  Let me know if you have any questions.  TRH

Is a trigger finger and swans neck deformity part of Dupuytren’s contracture?

Dear  Dr. Herazy,

I have Dupuytrens and swans neck and trigger thumb.  Yes, I am Norwegian. 

My question is trigger thumb and swans neck a part of Dupuytren’s contracture?

Thank you

Kristina

 

Greetings Kristina,

There are many degrees of involvement of the fingers when a person has Dupuytren’s contracture; some are worse and more involved than others. 

A “trigger finger” occurs when a finger tendon stick or is caught in the tendon sheath due to sheath swelling or dryness.  Depending on the number of fingers affected, location and degree of involvement it is possible to have a trigger phenomenon of one or more fingers.  This is fairly common to happen in many cases of DC. See Trigger finger and Dupuytren’s contracture.

A “swan neck” deformity is a less common occurrence in Dupuytrens. This kind of finger deformity occurs when the cord pulls the involved finger in a state of hyperextension of the PIP joint, flexion of the DIP joint, and even sometimes an additional flexion of the metacarpophalangeal joint.  Sorry to get technical with you in this explanation but I know of no other way to explain it.   TRH

What should I change in my Dupuytren treatment plan?

Hi Dr. Herazy,

I am about to place my third order with you. I wanted to let you know about my 5 weeks of treatment so far. I started with your medium Dupuytren’s contracture treatment plan. For 2 weeks I have been taking 5 Neprinol capsules with 2 fundamental sulfur 3 times per day. I find it difficult to find times in the day where I haven’t eaten or plan to eat within 2 hours. I try to take one dose when I wake up in the middle of the night to visit the bathroom. Additionally I am taking your vitamin E and PABA (2 caps ea) once per day. I also try to take Scar X twice per day. Lastly I use topical vitamin E, copper serum with DMSO. This topical Dupuytrens treatment has really softend the surface of my palm. Callouses nearly gone.

I must say, it may be early in treatment but I have not noticed any difference in the dupuytren cords or nodules as far as reduction in size or hardness. I must tell you the unexpected good news about my foot. Plantar Fibroma (aka soft lumps) on the sole of my right foot. they are notably smaller. I have had them for 10 years at least. This to me is proof that your treatment is doing something. These foot lumps are not as hard as the hand dupuytrens lumps.

Additionally I have had 2 dupuytrens surgeries. First one in 2009 needle aponeurotomy. It was quick, some sharp pain during surgery. Results lasted about 3.5 years and grew back. My second surgery was just in Sept 2012. I tried Xiaflex. Dr. injected into the main cord only. It softened the cord enough where he could release it. I could hear and feel it snap like a rubber band. This is when I started your treatment. I am hoping your methods will at least prevent the cord from growing back. I still have cords running up my ring finger and in the web between my ring and pinky.

My questions to you are: what should I change? More Neprinol? or something else? I know you say its trial and error. I was just wondering if you had any comments or recommendations. I am sure these hard firm bands will take more time. But question the treatment plans effectiveness.

Also. When I wake I take my morning Neprinol dose with coffee. I know you say water but I can’t find three times per day where I can commit to 3 doses for 2 hour periods without some kind non-water intake. does caffeine negate the enzymes?

What about wine in the evening? Is that a no-no too?

Thanks for you help.

Jim VH

 

Greetings Jim,

Congratulations on the early progress you are making with the several problems you are dealing with. Five weeks is not a lot of treatment time and your therapy levels apparently have made some good tissue changes for you to be able to notice them so soon.  

What you have going on that puts you in a slightly different (and more difficult) category than a lot of people is that you have had multiple surgeries and you have more than just a Dupuytren’s contracture problem to correct. People who have had Dupuytrens hand surgery tend to take longer to recover while using Alternative Medicine, bu then again people who have had Dupuytrens surgery need this work a lot more since they have seen that recurrence of the lumps on the palm and cords is a real problem.  You cannot continue to have hand surgery when the problem will always come back, because a surgery or two more you will run out of tissue for the surgeon to work with.  At that point you will be worse off than before the surgery.  

I have worked with many people in the past who had plantar fibromas just as you do and I find that this tissue drains a lot of the Dupuytren treatment products away since it competes for them at the same time you are attempting to reduce the nodules and cords on your hand.  The more of these soft tissue problems that are present, the more therapy products that the body will need to address them all.  There is no way, other than the topical or external therapies that you use, to direct or select where the internal therapies will be used by the tissue; the rule apparently is an equal distribution since they travel in bloodstream.  I am confident that if you only had Dupuytren’s contracture and not the plantar fibromas to deal with, your current plan would be giving you greater improvement with the hand contracture problem. 

I suggest that you reduce the vitamin E to two capsules daily, total.  Also, I suggest that you consider taking perhaps three Neprinol more than your current dosage, and that you add these additional three to the end of the day when they will stay in your stomach and bloodstream longest while you go the longest time without eating.  You might also consider adding in acetyl-L-carnitine to your plan, starting at 3-4 capsules daily. 

Taking your Neprinol with coffee is not a great problem since caffeine does not influence the enzymatic activity or availability in any way.  Limited wine intake is also OK.    TRH   

Next Page »