Would Dupuytren contracture massage be helpful or aggravate the problem?

I am in the very early stages of this problem and want to know about Dupuytren contracture massage.  My problem started 6 months ago and want to try to turn this around sooner than later…. Not sure I can afford or even want to take everything on your plans….so if you could list out the TOP 6 supplements to take, could you let me know…?  Would 6 even be enough?

Do you think massage helps Dupuytrens contracture? Or would it aggravate it?

I have one other question…..lets say I get the most expensive plan as well as the most expensive enzyme you sell…which would be a ton of money to maintain over the months….and I do get positive results…what is to stop it from coming back again like it might after surgery? I want to get to the UNDERLYING cause of this rather than treating the symptoms. I know some say it is genetic but I am wondering about diet etc. It makes no sense to spend thousands on supplements which it could end up costing that for the body to re absorb the tissue, which I believe the body is capable of doing…only to have it come back again…..

Regards, Catherine

 

Greetings Catherine,

Your thoughtful questions bring up many broad and interesting topics to explore that I believe will not only help you, but others as well.

The first point is that you do not need  to “take everything” found in the DCI plans.  These various plans are well rounded and balanced examples of what a person might need to use to enhance their healing ability against the foreign fibrous tissue of Dupuytren’s contracture.  No one knows what you might need to make this happen, or even if it will happen.  The idea is to do as much, and to take as much of a variety of nutrients, as you think reasonable and appropriate to get the job done.   The problem is that no one knows what you will need to get the job done.  Because of this DCI recommends that you use a broad and diverse array of possible therapies, while monitoring the size, shape, density, surface features and degree of adhesion of the deep and superficial fibrous tissue in your hand plus the range of motion of the involved fingers, to determine the effectiveness of the therapy you are using.

As a second point, there are no top six therapies in terms of those that are most effective because the therapies are not used this way.  They are all used in groups and combinations, and it is never recommended that any one therapy be used by itself as a solo therapy.   Besides, if I could give you a top six list it would not mean that they would necessarily help you.  What works for one person will not necessarily work for the next person in the same way.

Dupuytren contracture massage

Thirdly, Dupuytren contracture massage can be helpful, but extreme caution and care must be followed.  I have seen internet discussions in which people have recommended deep and forceful pushing and gouging of the internal fibrous tissue to “break it up.”  This is a mistake that can lead to aggravation and spreading of of the initial problem.   The best kind of soft tissue work is extremely light and passive manual stretching – so light that while you are doing it you think that it is too light to be effective.  Dupuytren contracture massage must be done with grave caution since it can easily be misused, and you only realize you have overdone it when it is too late

Lastly, you ask about recurrence of Dupuytren contracture after DCI treatment.  Dupuytren recurrence is a constant problem that has plagued surgeons for centuries and even to today.    Please see Dupuytren Surgery and Recurrence of Hand Contracture.   Even so, in almost 12 years of doing this work of helping people to deal with their hand contracture using Alternative Medicine I have never had the occasion of someone coming back who got good results to say that their problem recurred after using the DCI concepts of treatment.  Perhaps there is someone out there who had their DC return, you never know, but no one has told me so.  I suppose it is possible, but I have no knowledge of it.

Even if the DC did recur after DCI style treatment, the consequences would be far different than if the DC did recur after hand surgery.  When a hand is operated on for Dupuytrens, normal healthy tissue is removed along with the diseased tissue.  As a result of that hand surgery the hand is vastly different than it was before surgery; it has been diminished and is less structurally strong; not only are some tissues now missing, many are shortened and altered by the surgeon.   When –not if – Dupuytren contracture recurs after the first hand surgery, the next surgeon will have less tissue to work with for the second hand surgery.  If the second hand surgery is done then the next recurrence will be all the more difficult for the third hand surgery.  For this reason many people find that after the 2nd or 3rd surgery – and sometimes even after the 1st surgery – that no more surgeries can be performed.  These people face the possibility of either allowing the hand to develop full blown contracture or amputation.

All I can tell you is that it makes most sense to me to be as conservative as possible and to try as many non-surgical options as make sense to you before submitting to DC surgery.   I am not against DC hand surgery, just very conservative about its use because of the dire results I encounter on an almost daily basis.

If I can help you in any way please let me know.  TRH

Why not perform hand surgery before my Dupuytren contracture gets worse, while it is still small?

Hello: I have just recently been diagnosed with Dupuytren’s contracture. I noticed a small hard bump/lump appear in the palm of my right hand, as well as one on the bottom of my right foot. I have just turned 50 and I am female. If the outcome is ‘black and white’, why not perform hand surgery to remove the bump BEFORE it grows into a long band deforming the fingers / toes?  Why wait ?

 

Greetings,

The answer is simple:  Dupuytren contracture recurrence after surgery. For more discussion of this topic see Dupuytren Surgery and Recurrence of Hand Contracture.

You are a little younger than average to develop Dupuytren’s contracture (hand) and Ledderhose disease (foot), and for this reason you are more likely to have an ongoing problem with Dupuytrens; the earlier in life it starts, the more aggressive and difficult the palm lumps and cords tend to be.  Your doctor is trying to delay your surgery for Dupuytren’s contracture to delay the time when your first recurrence starts.

Let’s say you had hand surgery the way that you propose.   If you had your first Dupuytren’s operation at age 50, it is possible to have your first recurrence start within two years.  Following your idea of early surgery to prevent progression of the problem, let’s say you had your  second hand surgery as soon as the recurrence appeared, and the next Dupuytren’s recurrence again appeared within the next two years.   Following your idea of early surgery to prevent progression of the problem, let’s say you had your  third hand surgery as soon as that next recurrence appeared,  and the next recurrence again appeared within the next two years.   Again, you would theoretically have another surgery for Dupuytren’s recurrence, with another recurrence, and so on. 

The above example does not work for three reasons:

  1. Recurrence of Dupuytren’s contracture tends to accelerate with each surgery, so that if the first recurrence did take two years to eventually develop, the net recurrence would be a little faster or sooner; maybe 18 months.  And if you had another hand surgery after that recurrence, the next recurrence would theoretically be even faster or sooner; maybe 12 months.   Of course, all these numbers are just made up, and could be faster or slower depending on your individual characteristics, family history, life history, clinical information and luck.   Some people wait 10 years for their first recurrence of Dupuytren’s contracture, but some people wait just a year – or even less for their first recurrence to appear.  Once the surgery starts, the process of recurrence starts; it is inevitable.   
  2. Each Dupuytren’s surgery “uses up” or removes normal hand tissue.  You cannot have too many hand surgeries without soon having little normal tissue remaining.  Depending on your individual circumstances you might only be able to have one, two or three hand surgeries in your life before your surgeon would inform you that you cannot have any more.   What do you do at that point?  You allow it to get worse, and perhaps become so bad in terms of pain that amputation is your only option. 
  3. No good surgeon would perform an early Dupuytren surgery, such as you have proposed.  Hopefully you would never find a surgeon who would agree to cut early, because he/she would know that this would be a terrible decision that would lead to a terrible result.  

There are drugs that have risks that can be used, and there is surgery as an option for you to consider. I suggest that you should consider trying to avoid Dupuytren’s hand surgery completely.  Since your problem is early and small at this time you are in a good position to try to reverse this process naturally.  I suggest you do some reading to see if this makes sense to you.  You can always try it for 2-3 months of intense natural therapy while you are waiting for your Dupuytren’s to progress.  If it work, fine – look at what you have gained.  If it does not work, as sometimes happens, you can always have your hand surgery when your surgeon thinks you are ready for it.  

For further information about treating Dupuytren’s contracture naturally you can read What is the best therapy to treat Dupuytren contracture?    TRH

Since I am allergic to sulfur can I treat my Dupuytrens contracture with sulfur containing supplements?

Hello Dr. Herazy,

I have been looking at your various treatment plans for Dupuytren contracture.  Each plan contains Fundamental Sulfur, or more technically methyl sulfonyl methane.  I am allergic to sulfur drugs.  Since I cannot take sulfur, will the treatment plans still be effective in treating the lump on the palm from my Dupuytrens?

 

Greetings,

As you know, sulfur sensitivity and allergies are not uncommon.  Over the years I have worked with many people who have allergy to sulfur drugs, a few very severe, and they have used all the DCI sulfur mineral supplement (Fundamental Sulfur) without any reported problem.  While I cannot predict how you might respond I can only tell you that others have no problem while using it like anyone else .   

I assume the difference that a person with a sulfur allergy can use this particular sulfur product comes down to fundamental chemistry.  The sulfur in these supplements is recognized by the body as a nutritional substance or food, and not as a foreign sulfur configuration of a drug that the body has never seen or metabolized previously; since this kind of sulfur is natural and organic, with the micronutrients and enzymes that are present with foods that contain sulfur, the supplement is more likely to be handled differently and appropriately by the body.  It is different with a sulfur containing drug, whether oral or topical.  In these situations the sulfur is not combined with chemicals in a way that is typical in nature. 

If I can help you in any way with your Dupuytren’s treatment, please let me know.   TRH

 

Could statin drugs to control my cholesterol have caused my Dupuytren’s contracture?

I have Dupuytren contracture; 59 years old white female. I have been on 80 mg of a statin for several years. I understand statin drugs can be very harmful to the liver, especially at this dose?  Since, I have decided to stop taking it for that reason. Do you think this could have caused the Dupuytren contracture, since your above reply implies liver disease? I do not drink alcohol but could this high dose of the statin have caused liver damage leading to the Dupuytrens?

Thank you,

Jennifer

 

Greetings Jennifer,

You are correct that high dosage statin intake has been implicated in Dupuytren’s contracture.  The exact mechanism that statin drugs might cause Dupuytrens as a side effect are not completely understood at this time, although liver damage is often mentioned as a possibility. Please see Dupuytren Cause Could Be Related to Drugs

You should speak to the doctor who prescribed your statin drug for you, who did not explain the possibility that Dupuytren’s contracture might occur as a result, and ask these same questions and listen closely to the answer.   TRH

My 25 year-old son has Dupuytren’s contracture. What treatment would you recommend?

Hi Dr. Herazy,
I came across your website while searching for more information on Dupuytren Contracture. My son had intricate surgery on his finger in June and recently noticed a small lump on the palm of his hand. It’s not painful, but the doctor said it looked like Dupuytren Disease. He is only 25 years old and I am very concerned about the future. Have you seen this before in someone his age and can he stop the progression of this disease with your products? What treatment would you recommend for someone his age? There also may be a predisposition to this as I have a painful lump on the bottom of my foot that I will be checking out with a doctor. Thank you very much.
PG

 

Greetings PG,

You are a good parent.  Once a parent, always a parent.  My youngest one of three is soon to be 38, so I know how this goes.

My guess is that you have a genetic predisposition to this excessive fibrous tissue response that your son has inherited from you.  This is made even more so if both you and your husband/wife are also genetically predisposed with families coming from Northern Europe or Scandinavia.  If this is true it would explain why some one who is so young has developed this problem.  Perhaps your son has unknowingly made himself susceptible with other factors that increase the odds for Dupuytrens:  diabetes, cigarette smoking, alcoholism, and prolonged hand stress  like with manual labor.  I also notice that many serious musicians who play piano or guitar seem to develop DC more than the average population.  Any of these might explain this problem developing so early in his life. 

I have seen this before in people in their mid-20s and it is usually accompanied by factors as I have explored above.

I would recommend the largest and most aggressive treatment he can sustain for at least 3-4 months of faithful and diligent work.   If this problem is to respond at all to Alternative Medicine methods the treatment approach must be significant to make an impact on his condition.  Please read Can I treat Dupuytren’s contracture naturally without surgery or drugs?       Dupuytrens is a tough problem.  Half efforts are usually a waste of time.  Allow me to explain why I think someone such as your son should be extremely interested – far more than most all other people – in avoiding surgery and getting natural conservative treatment to increase his ability to eliminate his hand nodule.  

Hand surgery for Dupuytren’s contracture is not a cure; any good surgeon will tell you that needle aponeurotomy, palmar fasciectomy or Xiaflex injection are just a temporary measure; the Dupuytren’s contracture problem will always recur – it is a matter of when the recurrence will develop, not if.  When someone in his 60s or 70s develops DC and has surgery, the Dupuytren recurrence factor is not as important because frankly at that age this person might not live long enough to develop the recurrence and have it evolve over a few years to the point that a second surgery is important to them.  Many elderly people get their first DC surgery and just ride out the effects of the recurrence as they try to ignore a growing hand problem.  But with a 25 year old person all of this strategy is changed.

A young person has a lifetime to not only develop one recurrence of Dupuytren contracture, but several or many.   Some people can have a recurrence in just just 2-3-4 years and a few have recurrence in a year or less.  With each surgery recurrence usually is made to come more quickly; with each hand surgery the rate of recurrence increases.  It is as though the irritation and instability created by the surgery speeds up the recurrence phenomenon.    Many times after a few surgeries are done it does happen that eventually amputation is the only viable option that remains. 

With someone in his mid-20s this can be a great problem, since there are so many wonderful years that lay ahead.   For this reason it is my opinion your son should do absolutely everything possible to avoid entering upon this slippery slope.  I suggest that your son start as soon as possible to see if he can increase his natural ability to remove this foreign fibrous palm lump.  As with anything in healthcare (like Dupuytren’s hand surgery) there are no guarantees this will work, but when you consider the fact that his approach is without side effects, that in almost 11 years we have not had one report of recurrence after successful treatment, and that surgery can also be used at a later time if  necessary.

I suggest he does some reading on the DCI site to learn how this approach is done.  Let me know if you have any questions.  TRH

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