Dupuytren Cords

Dupuytren cord causes finger contractures

Dupuytren contracture is thought to be primarily a genetic condition that mainly affects men over 50 years of age, with more aggressive forms starting at an earlier age.  Women also develop Dupuytren cords, but at a lesser rate until age 80 when the occurrence is about equal to men. The process involves excess collagen material that creates Dupuytren cords in the palm of the hand, most often affecting the 4th and 5th fingers.   These cords are nodular in two out of three cases, displaying from one to three nodules when present.

Onset occurs as a palm nodule or bump that many assume is only a callus.  Gradually, over a few or many months, the Dupuytren cord becomes more prominent and the palmar fascia thickens. As the process continues the overlying skin puckers, dimples, and roughens. The thick cords contract slowly over time, drawing the fingers into the palm and may bring adjacent fingers together. The ring and little finger are most commonly affected and usually are affected first when other fingers are also involved.  As is typical of similar conditions in which excess collagen is deposited (Ledderhose disease, Peyronie’s disease, Garrod’s pads) the progression is often erratic, arbitrary, continues in spite of medical treatment, and has no obvious cause.

Dupuytren cords treated with Alternative Medicine

Dupuytren cords are composed of collagen connective tissue right under the skin, in a layer called the palmar fascia.  As the Dupuytren contracture progresses the cords begin to thicken and shorten, causing them to develop a wider display of nodules and folds of thick tissue on the surface of the palm.  Tightening and shortening of the Dupuytren cords pulls the involved fingers down toward the palm in the characteristic hand posture of Dupuytren contracture.

Dupuytren’s contracture is more likely to be found in those who also have epilepsy (anticonvulsant medications are suspected to be the stimulus), diabetes, alcoholism, HIV, liver cirrhosis, and smoking. Trauma and exposure to chronic hand vibration may also exacerbate this condition.

Needle aponeurotomy or more aggressive surgical intervention are the only current medical methods offered to temporarily alleviate some of the outward appearance of Dupuytren contracture.  In spite of having both needle aponeurotomy and surgery, 50% of patients who have either procedure will still experience a recurrence of the palm nodules and Dupuytren cords within two to three years.

There is another option to consider using to slow down or even reduce the size, shape and  density of Dupuytren cords.   The Dupuytren Contracture Institute has specialized since 2002 in the use of Alternative Medicine therapies and techniques that are found to be successful in perhaps 60-80% of cases of Dupuytrens without risk of worsening or side-effects.  Click here for helpful ideas to start a Dupuytren treatment plan with Alternative Medicine.

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